The Butcher’s Diamond by Anita S. Pulier

Rated 5.00 out of 5 based on 3 customer ratings
(3 customer reviews)

$19.99

 

When Anita Pulier explains to her late father in “Why I Read Poetry” that “occasionally I stumble on a poem that delivers an oxygen blast, a poem that stops me short in a realm of stark recognition,” she is describing what we find in her own exquisite works that startle and move us with the insights and wisdom they extract from the mundane encounters of daily life.

–Robert A. Rosenstone, author of Do People Look Up at the Moon Anymore?, Red Star, Crescent Moon, Adventures of a Postmodern Historian and nine non-fiction history books.

 

“Hang banners and blow up balloons,” a line from one of Anita Pulier’s poems, struck me as a celebratory description of her first full-length book of poems, The Butcher’s Diamond. For that is what Pulier does, she celebrates the quotidian realities of her life in the city she loves and lives in, New York. Chance encounters, time spent with grandkids, the mundane embellished with love and a little quirkiness, like owning “a toaster with three settings: bagel, waffle and poetry,” or relishing an eye-opening dinner with Auden and Spender. In poem after poem, there is a deep sense of gratitude, for a long and loving marriage, for old friends, for the survival of prosthetic hips. In every line, straight-on ovations to “the life worth living.”

–Florence Weinberger, author of Sacred Graffiti, The Invisible Telling Its Shape, Breathing Like A Jew and Carnal Fragrance.

 

 

Description

PREORDER PURCHASE SHIPS JANUARY 12, 2018

The Butcher’s Diamond

by Anita S. Pulier

$19.99, Full-length, paper

RESERVE YOUR COPY TODAY

Anita’s chapbooks, Perfect Diet, The Lovely Mundane and Sounds of Morning are published by Finishing Line Press. Her poems have appeared both online and in print in many journals and in the anthologies Grabbing the Apple, the poetry edition of Legal Studies Forum and Aunt Poems by The Emma Press.

After retiring from her law practice in Brooklyn Anita happily traded legal writing for poetry. Anita and her husband Myron now split their time between the Upper West Side and Los Angeles.

3 reviews for The Butcher’s Diamond by Anita S. Pulier

  1. Rated 5 out of 5

    When Anita Pulier explains to her late father in “Why I Read Poetry,” that “occasionally I stumble on a poem that delivers an oxygen blast, a poem that stops me short in a realm of stark recognition,” she is describing what we find in her own exquisite works that startle and move us with the insights and wisdom they extract from the mundane encounters of daily life.

  2. Rated 5 out of 5

    “Hang banners and blow up balloons,” a line from one of Anita Pulier’s poems, struck me as a celebratory description of her first full-length book of poems, “The Butcher’s Diamond.” For that is what Pulier does, she celebrates the quotidian realities of her life in the city she loves and lives in, New York. Chance encounters, time spent with grandkids, the mundane embellished with love and a little quirkiness, like owning “a toaster with three settings: bagel, waffle and poetry,” or relishing an eye-opening dinner with Auden and Spender. In poem after poem, there is a deep sense of gratitude, for a long and loving marriage, for old friends, for the survival of prosthetic hips. In every line, straight-on ovations to “the life worth living.”

  3. Rated 5 out of 5

    Humor, adventure and insight abound in Anita Pulier’s first full-length volume of poems. In “The Butcher’s Diamond,” also the book’s title, a diamond ring holds the key to her Aunt Freda’s disappointing love life and her own mother’s socialist ambivalence about jewelry when she inherits the ring. In a section titled “Metropolitan Life” about New York City where the poet lives for some of the year, “Face to Face” describes an encounter with a stranger—a hip, elderly African-American woman with a “…pink dyed patch of hair.” As they ride the M104 bus the stranger points to her prosthetic leg that replaced the limb she lost in a subway accident. She tells the author she’s on her way to “…Columbia Medical School for a meeting/of prosthetic limb users./They use her as an inspiration.” Whether the poems in The Butcher’s Diamond reflect family, a loving, long term marriage, aging and the world, Anita Pulier has a great talent for making ordinary life feel remarkable.

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